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Women's group behind rebel memorials quietly battles on


Added 08-10-18 02:03:01am EST - “On a glorious, late-spring day, Maya Little strode across the poplar-lined University of North Carolina quadrangle, past protesters and a uniformed officer. She stepped onto the base of the Confederate soldier statue that has stood…” - Washingtontimes.com

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Posted By TheNewsCommenter: From Washingtontimes.com: “Women’s group behind rebel memorials quietly battles on”. Below is an excerpt from the article.

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) - On a glorious, late-spring day, Maya Little strode across the poplar-lined University of North Carolina quadrangle, past protesters and a uniformed officer. She stepped onto the base of the Confederate soldier statue that has stood there since 1913, and splashed it with a mixture of red ink and her own blood.

The 25-year-old doctoral candidate was sending a message to Chancellor Carol Folt that the monument - nicknamed “Silent Sam” - was an affront to black students like her, “the celebration of an army that fought for our ancestors’ enslavement.” But Little was also speaking to the group responsible for erecting this memorial to “the Lost Cause” - the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

“There is no Silent Sam without black blood, without violence towards black people,” Little said recently as she sat in the statue’s shadow, campus security guards hovering behind nearby trees and columns. “I would say all that blood is on their hands. And it will continue to be until they take a stand - until they … make an effort to take these monuments down and to be a part of actual racial equality, racial justice.”

But the Daughters had already made their position clear months before Little’s protest and arrest. Last summer, in the wake of riots over the proposed removal of a monument to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville, Virginia, the group issued a rare public statement.

“We are grieved that certain hate groups have taken the Confederate flag and other symbols as their own,” President General Patricia M. Bryson wrote following the Aug. 12 clashes that left one woman dead. But while Bryson insisted that the UDC condemns anyone who “promotes racial divisiveness or white supremacy,” she argued that the Confederate ancestors honored by these memorials “were and are Americans.”

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