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What you need to know about Germany's new chancellor and coalition government

Added 12-08-21 01:07:02am EST - “Social Democratic politician Olaf Scholz will take over from center-right Angela Merkel as chancellor and will lead a coalition of three different parties in government.” - Npr.org

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Posted By TheNewsCommenter: From Npr.org: “What you need to know about Germany's new chancellor and coalition government”. Below is an excerpt from the article.

Olaf Scholz (center) and Saskia Esken (second left) of the Social Democrats, Annalena Baerbock (right) and Robert Habeck (second right) of the Greens and Christian Lindner (third right) of the Free Democrats pose for photos after signing a coalition agreement between the three parties on Tuesday in Berlin. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

Olaf Scholz (center) and Saskia Esken (second left) of the Social Democrats, Annalena Baerbock (right) and Robert Habeck (second right) of the Greens and Christian Lindner (third right) of the Free Democrats pose for photos after signing a coalition agreement between the three parties on Tuesday in Berlin.

BERLIN — Olaf Scholz is scheduled to be sworn in as Germany's chancellor on Wednesday, marking the end of Angela Merkel's 16-year tenure.

Scholz's center-left Social Democratic Party, which won the most votes in September's federal election, will govern along with the Greens and the libertarian Free Democratic Party.

In recent days, each party has approved a coalition agreement that lays out government objectives, including raising the minimum wage to 12 euros/hour ($13.50), phasing out coal-fired power plants by 2030 and a pledge for the country to go carbon neutral by 2045. And Scholz has announced members of cabinet that include politicians from the three parties.

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