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Typhoon Hagibis Leaves 2 Dead As Flooding And Landslides Threaten More Lives


Added 10-12-19 05:06:01pm EST - “The typhoon, which has now passed to the northeast of Tokyo, was the largest to hit Japan in 61 years, since the 1958 Kanogawa Typhoon that killed more than 1,200 people.” - Npr.org

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Posted By TheNewsCommenter: From Npr.org: “Typhoon Hagibis Leaves 2 Dead As Flooding And Landslides Threaten More Lives”. Below is an excerpt from the article.

Workers stack sandbags at a construction site in preparation for Typhoon Hagibis on Enoshima Island, Kamakura, west of Tokyo on Friday. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

Workers stack sandbags at a construction site in preparation for Typhoon Hagibis on Enoshima Island, Kamakura, west of Tokyo on Friday. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Typhoon Hagibis, the largest to hit Japan in 61 years, made landfall Saturday evening, sweeping northeast through the Tokyo region as a 5.7 magnitude earthquake struck an area in the storm's path earlier that day.

According to NHK, Japan's national broadcaster, the storm's path has left two dead, 10 missing and 90 injured so far, the 19th named storm this year. At least eight rivers have flooded their banks, several dams have begun discharging water and landslides threaten those sheltering in their homes as Hagibis continues to pour down a record amount of rain and whip the land with strong winds. If the dams do release their water in an emergency measure, they risk flooding downstream areas that already face storm surges, where civilians may not have evacuated.

As NPR reported on Friday, the Japan Meteorological Agency forecast chief Yasushi Kajihara said that Hagibis resembled the 1958 Kanogawa Typhoon that killed more than 1,200. Although the typhoon abated after landfall and has made its way back to the Pacific Ocean without numbers approaching those of the Kanogawa Typhoon, the death toll may rise as recovery and rescues continue for those threatened by continued flooding and landslides.

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