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Trump can't subtract his way to a majority


Added 10-22-19 12:23:01am EST - “In Colorado, Republican Senator Cory Gardner trails Democrat John Hickenlooper by eleven points. In Iowa, Senator Joni Ernst, a veteran and one of the party's six female senators, also trails her opponent by a sizable spread.” - Washingtonexaminer.com

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Posted By TheNewsCommenter: From Washingtonexaminer.com: “Trump can't subtract his way to a majority”. Below is an excerpt from the article.

In Colorado, Republican Senator Cory Gardner trails Democrat John Hickenlooper by eleven points. In Iowa, Senator Joni Ernst, a veteran and one of the party’s six female senators, also trails her opponent by a sizable spread.

Both seem to be people a party would kill for: attractive, articulate, coalition builders and plausible future contenders for national office, whom a party with only the most feeble instinct for self-preservation would fight like the devil to keep. But they are only two of the very large number of people the party has lost or is poised to lose with Donald Trump as president and party leader. He is the rare politician who has not a clue in the world how to build coalitions, to expand coalitions, or to keep his own party intact.

In fact, he has been trying to undo, divide, and unravel this party since he began his campaign. He was a minority winner of the presidential election, losing the national popular vote by nearly three million. He was a minority winner for the Republican nomination, never winning half the votes cast in the primaries. As president, his approval ratings have never strayed much above the low to mid-40s. It is as if he has decided that driving people away is the key to success in elections, as he has been doing so much of it.

After winning the most vicious campaign in American history, Thomas Jefferson said, "We are all Federalists, we are all Republicans." Eight years later, he left a one-party country; even Richard M. Nixon said after his 1968 victory that he wanted to "bring us together," though that didn’t last long.

Trump, in contrast, began his reign on a sour and truculent note, making no effort at all to co-opt or recruit his Republican critics, or to coax one-time foes into a broad coalition. Instead, he tried to widen the split between his own fans and the Republicans who voted for him out of party loyalty or loathing of Hillary. He put a huge strain on those who did not reside in deeply Red states and districts, even though he really needed the votes of both kinds of Republicans to survive.

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