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The Real Cost of Colonial Pipeline's $5 Million Ransom

Added 05-14-21 07:06:02am EST - “Stopping payments would go a long way to stopping ransomware. But the choice is never quite so easy.” - Wired.com

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Posted By TheNewsCommenter: From Wired.com: “Colonial Pipeline Paid a $5M Ransom—and Kept a Vicious Cycle Turning”. Below is an excerpt from the article.

Nearly a week after a ransomware attack led Colonial Pipeline to halt fuel distribution on the East Coast, reports emerged on Friday that the company paid a 75 bitcoin ransom—worth as much as $5 million, depending on the time of payment—in an attempt to restore service more quickly. And while the company was able to restart operations Wednesday night, the decision to give in to hackers' demands will only embolden other groups going forward. Real progress against the ransomware epidemic, experts say, will require more companies to say no.

Not to say that doing so is easy. The FBI and other law enforcement groups have long discouraged ransomware victims from paying digital extortion fees, but in practice many organizations resort to paying. They either don't have the backups and other infrastructure necessary to recover otherwise, can't or don't want to take the time to recover on their own, or decide that it's cheaper to just quietly pay the ransom and move on. Ransomware groups increasingly vet their victims' financials before springing their traps, allowing them to set the highest possible price that their victims can still potentially afford.

In the case of Colonial Pipeline, the DarkSide ransomware group attacked the company's business network rather than the more sensitive operational technology networks that control the pipeline. But Colonial took down its OT network as well in an attempt to contain the damage, increasing the pressure to resolve the issue and resume the flow of fuel along the East Coast. Another potential factor in the decision, first reported by Zero Day, was that the company's billing system had been infected with ransomware, so it had no way to track fuel distribution and bill customers.

Advocates of zero tolerance for ransom payments hoped that Colonial Pipeline's proactive shutdown was a sign that the company would refuse to pay. Reports on Wednesday indicated that the company had a plan to hold out, but numerous subsequent reports on Thursday, led by Bloomberg, confirmed that the 75 bitcoin ransom had been paid. Colonial Pipeline did not return a request for comment from WIRED about the payment. It is still unclear whether the company paid the ransom soon after the attack or days later, as fuel prices rose and lines at gas stations grew.

“I can’t say I’m surprised, but it’s certainly disappointing,” says Brett Callow, a threat analyst at antivirus company Emsisoft. “Unfortunately, it’ll help keep United States critical infrastructure providers in the crosshairs. If a sector proves to be profitable, they’ll keep on hitting it.”

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