Where the Comment is King

THE NEWS COMMENTER

VOTE  (0)  (0)

Chauvin trial footnotes (4)

Added 05-09-21 07:31:02am EST - “I have posted three previous editions of footnotes to our coverage of the trial of Derek Chauvin for the death of George Floyd. My purpose here is to provide background on the legal issues in the case for those who seek to understand…” - Powerlineblog.com

CLICK TO SHARE

Posted By TheNewsCommenter: From Powerlineblog.com: “Chauvin trial footnotes (4)”. Below is an excerpt from the article.

I have posted three previous editions of footnotes to our coverage of the trial of Derek Chauvin for the death of George Floyd. My purpose here is to provide background on the legal issues in the case for those who seek to understand them. I post these footnotes in the form of bullet points and differentiate facts and law from (my) opinion. Previous editions are included below under May 5, May 2 and April 25. Today I want to add six footnotes in the same form:

• By far the biggest news in the case last week was the indictment of Chauvin and his three former colleagues on federal civil rights charges here in the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota. I posted the government’s press release on Scribd here. It lists eight attorneys — count ’em — prosecuting the case. Query who was responsible for running the investigation and securing the indictments from the grand jury.

• One would never get a hint from reading the coverage here by Minneapolis’s Star Tribune or here (May 7) here (May 8) by the Associated Press that the charges might be redundant and abusive.

• My friend Andrew McCarthy devoted his weekly NR column to the new charges yesterday. Andy is of course the former Assistant United States Attorney who prosecuted the Blind Sheikh. He knows what he is talking about and his lengthy column arrives at this key judgment: “As a law-enforcement matter, the federal prosecution is not defensible.”

• Here is the full paragraph, italicized for emphasis: “As a law-enforcement matter, the federal prosecution is not defensible. It is a needlessly redundant expenditure of federal resources to achieve a result that will already have been achieved by the state prosecutions. It puts defendants in jeopardy a second time for the same wrongful actions. Convictions would not advance accountability, but there is a significant risk of acquittals that would undermine accountability. And, under the guise of prosecuting an abuse of civil rights, the Justice Department and its Civil Rights Division are quite intentionally violating the civil rights of the defendants to fair criminal proceedings in the state court.”

Read more...







If you don't see any comments yet, congrats! You get first comment. Be nice and have fun.

CLICK TO SHARE

BACK TO THE HOME-PAGE