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Amash doubles down on Trump and impeachment


Added 05-20-19 02:57:02pm EST - “Rep. Justin Amash (R-Mich.) on Monday doubled down on his critical remarks of President Trump, detailing in a series of tweets why he thinks the case can be made that Trump should be impeached for obstruction of justice.” - Thehill.com

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Posted By TheNewsCommenter: From Thehill.com: “Amash doubles down on Trump and impeachment”. Below is an excerpt from the article.

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashClash with Trump marks latest break with GOP leaders for Justin Amash Trump fires back at 'loser' GOP lawmaker who said he'd engaged in 'impeachable conduct' Romney: Justin Amash 'reached a different conclusion' than I did on impeachment MORE (R-Mich.) on Monday doubled down on his critical remarks of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: 'I will not let Iran have nuclear weapons' Rocket attack hits Baghdad's Green Zone amid escalating tensions: reports Buttigieg on Trump tweets: 'I don't care' MORE, detailing in a series of tweets why he thinks the case can be made that Trump should be impeached for obstruction of justice.

"People who say there were no underlying crimes and therefore the president could not have intended to illegally obstruct the investigation—and therefore cannot be impeached—are resting their argument on several falsehoods," Amash tweeted.

In a series of subsequent tweets, Amash sought to shoot down a number of prominent defenses of the president's behavior illustrated in special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE's report.

Amash argued that it would be inaccurate to say "there were no underlying crimes" revealed by Mueller's investigation; that obstruction of justice requires an underlying crime; that the president should be allowed to use any means to end a so-called frivolous investigation; and that the threshold of "high crimes and misdemeanors" requires actual criminal charges.

If an underlying crime were required, then prosecutors could charge obstruction of justice only if it were unsuccessful in completely obstructing the investigation. This would make no sense.

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